Networking Your Home: Ethernet. Installing ethernet in your home for a… | by Citizen Upgrade | Level Up Coding
Technology

Networking Your Home: Ethernet. Installing ethernet in your home for a… | by Citizen Upgrade | Level Up Coding

Networking Your Home: Ethernet. Installing ethernet in your home for a… | by Citizen Upgrade | Level Up Coding

How to connect ethernet throughout house

This is probably the hardest part. Let’s analyze the process for a simple case.

The cable itself is called a “lifter” cable and it comes in a large box with a hole in it so you can continuously pull the cable out of a hole in the side. I bought a 1000 foot cat 6 lift for my job which is only $100. this is the cheapest high quality cable i found available to ship, and i tested it at 1gbps speeds (don’t have any 10gbps connections to test yet).

At home, I had an office wall that already had an ethernet jack. this is where I will install a new quad connector.

Since the hole was already there, what I had to do was use some fiberglass duct tape to go through the hole and into the electrical box. The grommet I’m showing is a single rod, but I don’t see one like it anymore, and this is the highest rated grommet I see on amazon today.

It’s harder to do when the electrical box is a full box instead of the low voltage mounting bracket I mentioned earlier. i used a dremel to cut bits off the electrical box to make feeding easier, but it was still more difficult.

If you don’t already have a through frame hole in your basement or attic, just measure very carefully and drill one. if that makes you sweat a lot, then hire an electrician to do a “wire drop”. most electricians won’t want anything to do with ethernet (or will overcharge you), but if you tell them you just want them to put the low voltage bracket on the wall and drop a cable between the floors without connecting it, they don’t it will be very expensive. especially if you provide the materials.

With the duct tape in place, I collected three more cat 6 cables and taped them to one side of the tape.

Here’s Tip #1: Be sure to stagger the ends of the wires when you tape them down. this creates a “wedge” rather than a sudden bulge by pushing the cable up through the wall.

Here’s Tip #2: If you find you’re having trouble forcing the wires up and moving them doesn’t help, use Vaseline. rub a little on the taped area of ​​the wires and that will help it slide through tight spots with less effort and without getting stuck on so many things.

Here’s tip #3: To run three wires at once, I had to guess the length and cut them first. when possible, use the guide wire directly out of the box. Run it through where you’ll eventually secure it to the joists, but don’t cut the end off until you’re sure it’s in the right place. this will save you several feet of cable each run.

If all went according to plan, you’ll have a wire (or wires) sticking out of your basement wall and ceiling or attic floor.

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